Google purchased a company that turns displays into speakers

Terry Joseph
January 12, 2018

Earlier today, Bloomberg reported that Google has quietly acquired a United Kingdom startup which aims to turn surfaces, such as phone displays, into speakers. The transfer of shares of Redux's holding company NVF Tech was confirmed by United Kingdom regulatory filings on 13 December, but Crunchbase says the deal happened in August.

Video shows man slap Harvey Weinstein at Arizona restaurant
Weinstein recoils, a little stunned, and Steve commands: "Get your fucking ass out of here man, you're a fucking piece of shit". The man said that Weinstein vehemently refused, although the restaurant manager stated that Weinstein did so politely.

Warriors vs. Clippers on Wednesday night
Golden State Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson (rest) has been ruled out for Wednesday's game against the Los Angeles Clippers .

Brad Pitt Bid $120000 to Watch 'Game of Thrones' With Emilia Clarke
Of course, the event was all for charity, with proceeds going towards the J/P HRO & Disaster Relief Organizations. Clarke was also among the gala's attendees but did not share a table with her Game of Thrones co-star Harrington.

The last public communication from Redux was in April 2017, when it unveiled its Panel Audio technology, which uses haptic vibrations and "bending wave" sounds to turn smartphone and tablet screens into high-quality speakers. Redux shutdown its website after Google's acquisition. I am not sure but the display-speaker integration may also help Google improve the haptic feedback on their phones. Bezel-less phones will benefit a great deal from the speaker-display tech and will be able to further reduce the jawline. On Ivanov's profile page, it says that Redux achieved a "successful exit" in August 2017, but it does not state the buyer. It basically focuses on turning surfaces, like the display of smartphones, into speakers. Apple recently adopted an advanced Taptic Engine in its iPhones and other devices that offers enhanced feedback, and Google may be planning to use Redux tech in a similar fashion. This technology has interesting ramifications and possible uses in Google's consumer lineup. If replaced, that could leave more space for a larger battery or other components: even, perhaps, the return of the 3.5mm headphone jack, were Google so inclined. If Google doesn't put Redux's technology in a smartphone, it's certainly possible that the company could put it on one of its very own Smart Displays. Their technology has been created for mobile and consumer devices, home appliances, automotive and aerospace applications but can be tailored to nearly any bespoke application.

Other reports by Free-Prsite

Discuss This Article