Jeremy Corbyn enjoys kickabout as politics takes a backseat

Todd Singleton
June 17, 2017

May also reappointed an old adversary - Michael Gove, a former rival for the Conservative leadership whom May fired from the Cabinet when she took office past year.

The announcement came after May lost Downing St. chiefs of staff Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill, who resigned Saturday. But in one of the most sensational nights in British electoral history, a resurgent Labour Party denied her an outright win, throwing the country into political turmoil.

But her campaign unraveled after a policy u-turn on care for the elderly, while Corbyn's old-school socialist platform and more impassioned campaigning style won wider support than anyone had foreseen.

Scotland voted to remain in the European Union, and Ms Davidson has called for a softer approach to the withdrawal process.

The best-selling Sun newspaper said senior members of the party had vowed to get rid of May, but would wait at least six months because they feared a leadership contest could propel Labour into power under Corbyn, who supports renationalisation of key industries and higher taxes for business and top earners. However due to her poor showing, May is now forced into an informal alliance with the socially conservative DUP who have campaigned for a "soft" Brexit, retaining more of the links to Europe that currently exist.

And if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the Conservative party has won the most seats and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent upon us to ensure that we have that period of stability, and that is exactly what we will do.

May has said that she will begin to form her government, with the support of the DUP (Democratic Unionists Party).

Ruth Davidson, the Conservative leader in Scotland, said she had asked May for assurances that there would be no attack on gay rights after a deal with the DUP.

The Protestant unionist party also had links with outlawed paramilitary groups during the years of Northern Ireland's "Troubles".

May's election kerfuffle inspired some Europeans to take an open jab at the British prime minister. "That's not a matter for me", she said.

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May and her team of ministers retain full legal powers and will continue heading the government, until a new one is sworn in.

"May won't be able to make any compromises because she lacks a broad parliamentary majority", he said.

May had spent the campaign denouncing Corbyn as the weak leader of a spendthrift party that would crash Britain's economy and flounder in Brexit talks, while she would provide "strong and stable leadership" to clinch a good deal for Britain.

Voters may have been unimpressed with her refrain that "no deal is better than a bad deal" because it raised the prospect of Britain crashing out of the EU without a trade-and-immigration system to replace the existing, well-integrated procedures that have evolved over decades of European integration. "It is far from guaranteed to vote the deal through".

The election result saw Mrs May scramble to form a minority government to have any kind of Commons majority.

The blame-game has started within the Conservative Party.

She told BBC Radio Wales: "We're still saying quite clearly that we would be ready to take over if Theresa May cannot cobble something together, and we're very doubtful that she can".

"May fights to remain PM", said the front page of the Daily Telegraph, while the Times of London said: "May stares into the abyss". It said Britain was "effectively leaderless" and the country "all but ungovernable". European officials are anxious that the weaker position of the Conservatives make a breakdown in negotiations more likely.

"But you've got to convince them of your credibility and that you can move from protesting about the government to being in government".

Other reports by Free-Prsite

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